AbslomRob's Watch Collection

  • So, uh...remember that clean up?

    Yeah, procrastinating is horrible, isn't it? But I'm working on it now; starting with the ebauch list. The movements links may take me a few days to straighten out, and I have a lot of new pages to build, so bear with me.

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  • Some clean up is in order

    I started this site not long after I started collecting, in part as a way to catalog and save what I've learned. Since, at the time, my collection was small, I simply attempted to describe each individual watch. However, I'm finding now that my "collection" has become rather large and unkempt, and this site isn't really very ... friendly. So over the next few months, I'm going to try to do two things. One, I'm going to go through my stuff and weed out the watches that I don't really care for. Or at least don't care enough for. In conjunction with that, I'll be trying to revise the site layout. This will be mostly notable in the Eatons category, as I'm aiming to remove the focus on individual watches and switch to more of an informational/timeline approach that looks at style and technical evolutions, with individual watches used as illustrations. At the same time, I'll remove the "brand" focus of the misc. section and make it more of a movement-caliber reference, since that's of more interest to me then the branding.

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  • My oldest wristwatch

    Picked this up from an ebay seller in Indonesia. Not normally a safe place to buy watches, but this one seems pretty legit. It's a basic 7jewel Gallet made T. Eatons watch in a typical AWCCo case, only with wire lugs and a reduced stem. Otherwise identical to the pocketwatches sold in the same timeframe. The serial wuld suggest near to the 1920's for this, based on my other 0size watches and various Eatons catalogs from that time.

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  • Added some Benrus' (Benri?)

    I picked this up earlier in the year off the bay because I couldn't hardly call myself a Benrus collector without one, and the price was decent, but my first attempt to clean and service it didn't yield a working watch, so I shelved it for a bit. This weekend, I decided to give it another go, and through a combination of more experience and possibly luck, the results have been ticking away on my wrist happily for most of the weekend. The watch is engraved with a date of 1951, which seems right for the model and case design. I'm not a big fan of gold hands/indices in a stainless case, but I'll live with it. I'm good like that.

    I've seen a lot of watches similar to this one; it must have been their most common model. The movement is a CE-3, which is based off the ETA 900. The date module is marvelously simple and effective, with a date quick-set by pushing in the crown. This involved adding a spring inside the movement (under the mainspring barrel), and slightly modifying the keyless works (mostly the setting lever). Changing the day is the standard 9:00 - 12:00 dance. The date quickset doesn't work too well; it'll advance a couple of times, then stop working until I pull out the crown and fiddle with the time a bit. Seems like something is getting bound up inside, but can't see where. Minor, 'cause I don't need to change the date that often. Shock protection is the older Benrus type.

    Case is odd for this era though; it's a three piece snap fit not unlike older pocket watches (i.e., you have to load the movement into through the front and secure it with case screws at the back). Might be because of the date module; it's surprisingly thick (with an extra-tall cannon pinion and seconds bit to reach through the dial). Or possibly they felt that with the crown-activated quick-set, they need to ensure that the movement was firmly seated.

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  • Pair of Russians

    Although I only have one picture so far. Both are retail versions sold through Canadian stores. The one I have pictured here is a typical Raketa 2609HA (I'm told the H in the model name designates the models designed for foreign retail). I've got a couple of these, actually; they must have made quite a few of the exact same watch. Note the SU on the bridge, which I'm told signifies "Soviet Union" (and differentiates it from later versions which say "RU" for "Russian" after the fall). The shockprotection on these is a bit annoying; although it looks similar to the Incabloc, the shock spring on the balance isn't "hinged", it just slides in. That part is easy enough. Its the spring on the escape wheel that's annoying, mostly because of the size and the difficulty in compressing the spring to make it fit under the edge of the hole.

    The other watch (which is still on my bench) is a classic Molijna, but is labeled "Marathon". Marathon is a Canadian company that I'm more familiar with as a provider of Gallet made movements to the U.S. Military. I'm not sure if this "marathon" is related, or if it's just a "name". But the finish on the movement is quite decent compared to some.

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